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Posts Tagged ‘howto’

Installing Adobe AIR and TweetDeck on Ubuntu 9.04

2009/06/17 1 comment

This is a short manual on how to install Adobe AIR and Adobe AIR applications such as TweetDeck on Ubuntu 9.04 (This instruction should also work with most up-to-date Linux distributions). Once you have confirmed that everything works (i.e. TweetDeck works), you can delete all downloaded files.

  1. Download Adobe AIR from their homepage: http://airdownload.adobe.com/air/lin/download/latest/AdobeAIRInstaller.bin
  2. Make AdobeAIRInstaller.bin executable

    $ chmod +x AdobeAIRInstaller.bin

  3. Install Adobe AIR

    $ sudo ./AdobeAIRInstaller.binThis will install Adobe AIR to /opt/Adobe AIR

  4. Download TweetDeck

    $ wget \
    http://tweetdeck.com/beta/TweetDeck_0_25_manual.air

  5. Install TweetDeck using Adobe AIR installer

    $ /opt/Adobe\ AIR/Versions/1.0/airappinstaller

  6. This will open a GUI installer and automatically start TweetDeck. Furthermore, a starter will be created on your desktop.
  7. The desktop starter is just a script. Here’s the content:

    ~/Desktop$ cat \
    tweetdeckfast.f9...21.1.desktop
    [Desktop Entry]
    Name=TweetDeck
    Comment=Welcome to TweetDeck - a unique way to view your twitter timeline
    GenericName=TweetDeck
    Exec='opt'/'TweetDeck'/bin'TweetDeck'
    Type=Application
    Terminal=false
    Icon=tweetdeckfast.f9...4c21.1
    StartupNotify=true
    X-KDE-StartupNotify=true
    Categories=Utility;
    X-AppInstall-Package=tweetdeckfast.f9..4c21.1
    X-AppInstall-Section=main

  8. To uninstall Adobe AIR and Adobe AIR applications, select “Programs” -> “Applications” -> Adobe AIR Uninstaller”. This will also automatically uninstall Adobe AIR applications (i.e. TweetDeck).

Maven2 Heap Overflow in JUnit test cases: Howto increase memory

2009/05/22 6 comments

For the past few days I was wondering why Maven’s install gave me a Heap Overflow exception on JUnit tests on some of my machines. I tried increasing the memory by using the environment variable MAVEN_OPTS, by passing the option “-Xmx512m” to the JVM through Eclipse and from the command line. All to no avail.

Then I found this blog entry by Keith Chapman. And it worked! Here’s the solution in short:

The JUnit tests ignore the environment variable MAVEN_OPTS. You have to tell Maven’s surefire plugin to increase memory. Add this to your pom.xml file:

<plugin>
  <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
  <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
  <configuration>
    <forkMode>pertest</forkMode>
    <argLine>-Xms512m -Xmx512m</argLine>
    <testFailureIgnore>false</testFailureIgnore>
    <skip>false</skip>
  </configuration>
</plugin>